BEAUTY IN THE FRIDGE

Flowers from Clay

0 19

My name is Beth O’Brien, and I live in a Zone 6b location in Fort Erie, Ontario. We purchased this new home five years ago, and the yard was a blank slate. It has been a constant learning experience to find plants that rabbits don’t eat, that are fairly drought tolerant, and that can grow in the hard clay soil. Amend, amend, amend.

I have been trying to achieve constant color throughout the growing season.

The front garden in May with spring bulbs.The front garden in May with spring bulbs

In June, blue salvia (Salvia nemorosa, Zone 3 - 8) takes center stage.In June, blue salvia (Salvia nemorosa, Zones 3–8) takes center stage.

In July, the stargazer lilies (Lilium ‘Stargazer’ Zone 3 - 8) bloom in mass.In July, the ‘Stargazer’ lilies (Lilium ‘Stargazer’, Zones 3–8) bloom in mass.

Another view of the front bed lined with Stargazer lilies.Another view of the front bed lined with ‘Stargazer’ lilies.

In August the dahlias are at their best, providing plenty of colors. I started them in April in a little greenhouse.In August the dahlias are at their best, providing plenty of colors. I started them in April in a little greenhouse.

This is a shade garden on the north side of a shed with a big clump of variegated Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra, Zone 5 – 9) in the middle.This is a shade garden on the north side of a shed with a big clump of variegated Japanese forest grass (Hakonechloa macra, Zones 5–9) in the middle.

Monarchs compete for nectar on the blooms of a butterfly bush (Buddleia davidii, Zone 5 - 9).Monarchs compete for nectar on the blooms of a butterfly bush (Buddleia davidii, Zones 5–9).

A favorite combination of asters, coneflowers and phloxA favorite combination: asters (Stokesia laevis, Zones 5–9), coneflowers (Echinacea spp., Zones 4–9), and phlox (Phlox paniculata, Zones 4–8)

Petunia ‘Bees Knees’ (annual) are easy maintenance in boxes on our deck.Petunia ‘Bees Knees’ (annual) are easy to maintain in boxes on our deck.

A group of coneflowers lasts well into the fall.A group of coneflowers lasts well into the fall.

Have a garden you’d like to share?

Have photos to share? We’d love to see your garden, a particular collection of plants you love, or a wonderful garden you had the chance to visit!

To submit, send 5-10 photos to [email protected] along with some information about the plants in the pictures and where you took the photos. We’d love to hear where you are located, how long you’ve been gardening, successes you are proud of, failures you learned from, hopes for the future, favorite plants, or funny stories from your garden.

If you want to send photos in separate emails to the GPOD email box that is just fine.

Have a mobile phone? Tag your photos on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter with #FineGardening!

You don’t have to be a professional garden photographer – check out our garden photography tips!

Do you receive the GPOD by email yet? Sign up here.

- Advertisement -

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.