BEAUTY IN THE FRIDGE

Joan’s New Garden

0 7

Joan Cogliano is sharing her garden with us today.

I moved to a new house in Weymouth, and it was a mess. I removed a leggy peach tree, two scraggly Alberta spruce, and several stunted barberry. I amended the soil, started a compost pile, enlarged a front bed, and started adding perennials and roses given by friends and family. Here is the progress after one year.

garden near the front steps of a homeA newly planted purple-leaf sand cherry (Prunus × cistena, Zones 2–8) in the back corner will grow into a large shrub. Various annuals and perennials fill the space for now.

Apricot Drift rose‘Apricot Drift’ rose (Zones 4–8) is a very disease-resistant variety with softly fragrant, apricot-colored blossoms.

Sweet alyssum in the gardenSweet alyssum (Lobularia maritima, annual) makes a mass of frothy white flowers in the front of this bed. Sweet alyssum generally prefers cooler weather, and newer varieties are sterile, which results in much longer, more prolific flowering as they put their energy into making blooms instead of seeds. However, the newer sterile varieties will not self-sow to come back the following year the way old-fashioned sweet alyssum will.

bright pink ChrysanthemumA warm, rich-hued Chrysanthemum (hardiness depends on variety) has its colors echoed beautifully by a lavender hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla, Zones 5–9) and a pink veronica (Veronica species or hybrid, perhaps the variety ‘Pink Potion’, Zones 4–8). The three colors are similar enough to complement each other, but different enough for contrast, and the spiky veronica blooms contrast nicely with the rounded forms of the hydrangea and chrysanthemum.

Apricot Drift rose with sweet alyssum behind itI bet the combination of ‘Apricot Drift’ rose with sweet alyssum behind it smells wonderful!

light pink peony bloomsIs there anything more spectacular than a clump of peonies (Paeonia hybrid, Zones 3–7) in full bloom?

Have a garden you’d like to share?

Have photos to share? We’d love to see your garden, a particular collection of plants you love, or a wonderful garden you had the chance to visit!

To submit, send 5-10 photos to [email protected] along with some information about the plants in the pictures and where you took the photos. We’d love to hear where you are located, how long you’ve been gardening, successes you are proud of, failures you learned from, hopes for the future, favorite plants, or funny stories from your garden.

If you want to send photos in separate emails to the GPOD email box that is just fine.

Have a mobile phone? Tag your photos on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter with #FineGardening!

You don’t have to be a professional garden photographer – check out our garden photography tips!

Do you receive the GPOD by email yet? Sign up here.

- Advertisement -

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.